Windows 2016 Containers

Containers are portable operating environments which typically utilise the same kernel whilst isolating applications. Software developers use containers to build, ship, and run applications. To the application the container gives the illusion of a totally isolated and independent operating system, in much the same way that a virtual machine doesn’t know it shares compute with other virtual machines; applications within containers are unaware they share a base operating system with other containers.

Using namespace isolation the host projects a virtualised namespace containing all the resources that an application can interact with, such as files, network ports, and running processes. Namespace isolation is extremely efficient since many of the underlying OS files, directories and running services are shared between containers. If and when an application makes changes to these resources then those changes are written to a distinct copy of that file or service using copy-on-write.

Containers house everything an application needs to run, and that gives it greater portability; allowing for exact copies between development and production environments. By using containers software developers and IT professionals can also benefit from improved efficiency in use of existing infrastructure, standardised environments, and simplified administration. This is evident from the Microsoft images below.

Deploying applications using traditional virtual machines:

containers2

Deploying applications using containers:

containers1

The user of containers isn’t new technology, it has been around for years in Linux before the toolset was properly utilised by Docker. Docker is a container technology which automates and simplifies the creation and deployment of containers to build, ship, and run distributed applications from any environment. Docker have partnered with Microsoft to develop a Docker engine for Windows 2016 and Windows 10, enabling users to take advantage of container functionality with Windows.

Windows containers run in two different formats; Windows Server containers which isolate applications using namespace isolation technology, and Hyper-V Containers which run containers inside optimised virtual machines.

Hyper-V containers have identical functionality to their Windows counterparts, the only difference is the isolation of the kernel. Whereas Windows containers share the same kernel with other containers and the host, Hyper-V containers provide kernel level isolation by provisioning individually optimised virtual machines for each container. A use case for such isolation could be a secure environment such as PCI compliance. Hyper-V containers need nested virtualisation to be enabled and this is currently only compatible with Intel processors.

Windows containers require installation of the Containers feature, and installation of the Docker engine. Once these two components are installed you can go ahead and begin building Windows server containers.

containers

Microsoft Azure are offering a free trial with £125 credit, to deploy a Windows 2016 virtual machine and try containers out for yourself see Azure Virtual Machine Deployment.

See also VMware Container Projects.

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