What is Oracle Cloud VMware Solution?

Introduction

Oracle Cloud VMware Solution (OCVS) provides high performance dedicated hardware using Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), running the full VMware software stack. Announced August 2020, Existing VMware and Oracle customers can now take advantage of:

  • Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) model with VMware overlay – abstracting functionality into the software for the customer to control, whilst consuming the underlying infrastructure as a service. This removes the overhead of traditional data centre maintenance tasks such as hardware and firmware patching, or failure remediation.
  • Cloud migrations with reduced risk and operational continuity – example use cases include data centre exits, data centre scale out, and disaster recovery or increased availability.
  • Hybrid applications and outcome focused refactoring – VMware workloads can run natively on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, but can also be refactored gradually over time, or where there are clear business drivers and priorities in doing so.
  • Secure single tenancy infrastructuretier 3 and 4 secure cloud data centres, as well as an exclusive dual-region Government Cloud for the UK public sector in London and Newport; connected through a high speed private network.
Example application migration and modernisation using Oracle Cloud VMware Solution

Oracle Cloud VMware Solution Explained

Oracle Cloud VMware Solution wraps up the automated deployment and configuration of VMware Cloud Foundation (VCF) onto physical hardware in Oracle’s cloud data centres. VCF is a standardised architecture made up of VMware’s market leading Software-Defined Data Centre (SDDC) stack, consisting of:

Oracle Cloud VMware Solution is priced per OCPU for physical nodes, and that includes the full service wrap, hardware, support, and VMware licensing. VMware’s HCX capabilities are also included, and features like L2 network extension combined with VCF provide seamless migrations of VMware workloads to the cloud. This goes a step beyond not having to refactor or rehost, it means not changing any of the virtual machine file format or network settings. It also means a common software based infrastructure across on-premises and the cloud, which infrastructure administrators continue to manage using their existing tools and skills.

OCVS is deployed to the customers existing Oracle Cloud account using an existing Virtual Cloud Network (VCN). Virtual machines residing in the SDDC can then integrate into native cloud services, like Oracle RAC, Exadata, and Database Cloud Services, using the Oracle Cloud backbone network. Along with full control over the Oracle Cloud account, the customer retains full administrative/root access within the VMware stack too, and this means end-to-end control over the environment, with the ability to implement zero trust security protocols and policies.

Announcing the Global Availability of Oracle Cloud VMware Solution

During the deployment process, OCVS asks for the region for hosting the SDDC. An Oracle Cloud region is a geographic area containing at least 1, but currently being built out to 3 availability domains. An availability domain is a data centre or site, and within it are 3 fault domains used to spread workloads across hardware and racks to prevent against common failures. The vSAN element of VCF will replicate storage between physical hosts for high availability across fault domains.

Although the management of the underlying infrastructure hardware is carried out by Oracle, the VMware stack is managed by the customer; giving them the choice of product versions to run and when to upgrade. This method allows full interoperability with existing third party solutions, like backups, monitoring, and security products, whilst reducing the risk of cloud migrations and data breaches. At the same time, removing the burden of hardware lifecycle management means engineers can focus on service improvements and project delivery.

A minimum of 3 and maximum of 64 physical nodes can be deployed in each vSphere cluster, using the bare metal (BM).DennseIO2.52 instance type. Each instance comes with 156 OCPUs, 2304 GB RAM, and 153 TB NVMe raw storage.

To read more about OCVS take a look at the Oracle documentation, as well as Simon Long’s blog where you can see an OCVS deployment and example integration with OCI services.

Oracle Cloud VMware Solution is the latest VMware Cloud Foundation hyperscaler offering, accelerating cloud migrations through familiar technologies and investments. Oracle and OCVS complements VMware partnerships with AWS (VMware Cloud on AWS), Microsoft (Azure VMware Solution), and Google (Google Cloud VMware Engine), allowing organisations to select the correct public cloud for their VMware workloads. If you’re interested in relocating VMware workloads to public cloud check out The Complete Guide to VMware Hybrid Cloud.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Demo

This opening post will give an overview and demo of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI). Oracle Cloud offers fast and scaleable compute and storage resources, combined with enterprise-grade private virtual cloud networks. Oracle Cloud offers a range of flexible operating models including traditional Virtual Machine (VM) instances, container infrastructure, databases on demand, and dedicated hardware through bare metal servers and Bring Your Own Hypervisor (BYOH).

You can sign up for a free trial account with $300 credit here. When you sign up for an Oracle account you are creating a tenant. Resources inside a tenant can be organised and isolated using compartments, separate projects, billing, and access policies are some use case examples.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure is deployed in regions. Regions are localised geographical areas, each containing at least 3 Availability Domains. An Availability Domain is a fault-independent data centre with power, thermal, and network isolation. A Virtual Cloud Network (VCN) is deployed per region across multiple Availability Domains, thereby allowing us to build high availability and fault tolerance into our cloud design. Virtual Cloud Networks are software defined versions of traditional on-premise networks running in the cloud, containing subnets, route tables, and internet gateways. VCNs can be connected together using VCN Peering, and connected to a private network using Fast Connect or VPN with the use of a Dynamic Routing Gateway (DRG).

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Product Demo

The demo below creates a VCN and VM instances in the second generation of Oracle Cloud for lab purposes. Before deploying your own environment you should review all the above linked documentation and plan your cloud strategy including IP addressing, DNS, authentication, access control, billing, governance, network connectivity and security.

Log into the Oracle Cloud portal here, the home dash board is displayed.

Oracle_Dashboard

You’ll need a subscription to get into the second generation Oracle Cloud Infrastructure portal. Under Compute select Open Service Console.

Oracle_Cloud_Dashboard

The region can be selected from the drop-down location pin icon in the top right corner, in this example the region is set to eu-frankfurt-1. Select Manage Regions to subscribe to new regions if required. Use the top left Menu button to display the various options. The first step in any deployment is to build the VCN, select Networking and Virtual Cloud Networks.

Oracle_Cloud_Dashboard

Make sure you are in the correct compartment in the left hand column and click Create Virtual Cloud Network. Select the compartment and enter a name, in this example I am going to create the Virtual Cloud Network only which will allow me to manually define resources such as the CIDR block, internet gateway, subnets, and routes. The DNS label is auto-populated.

Oracle_VCN_1

The newly created VCN is displayed, all objects are orange during provisioning and green when available.

Oracle_VCN_3

Once the VCN is available click the VCN name to display more options.

Oracle_VCN_4

Use the options in the Resources menu to view and create resources assigned to the VCN. In this example first we’ll create the Internet Gateway.

Oracle_Cloud_IG_1

Next we can create a subnet, in this example I have created a public subnet that I will later attach a VM instance to.

Oracle_Cloud_Subnet_1Oracle_Cloud_Subnet_2

We also need to add a route table or new routes into the default route table.

Oracle_Cloud_Route

The final step to allow connectivity in and out of our new subnet(s) is to define ingress and egress rules using security lists. Again you can either add rules to the default section or split out environments into additional security lists.

Oracle_Cloud_Security_1

Define the source and destination types and port ranges to allow access. In this example we are allowing in port 22 to test SSH connectivity for a VM instance.

Oracle_Cloud_Security_2

Now that we have a fully functioning software defined network we can deploy a VM instance. From the left hand Menu drop-down select Compute, Instances. Use the Create Instance wizard to deploy a virtual machine or bare metal machine.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance

In this example I have deployed a virtual machine using the Oracle Linux 7.5 image and VM.Standard2.1 shape (1 OCPU, 15 GB RAM). The machine is deployed to Availability Domain 1 in the Frankfurt region and has been assigned the public subnet in the VCN we created earlier. I used PUTTYgen to generate public and private key pairs for SSH access.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_2

Once deployed the instance turns green.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_3

Click the instance name to view further details or terminate, when removing you have the option to keep or delete the attached boot volume.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_4

Additional block volumes can be added to instances. Block volumes can be created under Block Storage, Block Volumes.

Oracle_Cloud_Block_2

For object based storage we can create buckets under Object Storage, Object Storage.

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_1

Buckets can be used to store objects with public or private visibility, pre-auth requests can also be added for short term access.

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_2

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_3