How to Install vSphere 7.0 – vRealize Operations Manager 8.2

How to Install vSphere 7.0 – vRealize Operations Manager 8.2

Introduction

In this post we take a look at a vRealize Operations (vROps) deployment for vSphere 7; building on the installation of vCenter 7.0 U1 and vSAN 7.0 U1. Shortly after installing vROps 8.2, vRealize Operations 8.3 was released. The install process is similar, you can read what’s new here and see the upgrade process here.

vRealize Operations is an IT operations management tool for monitoring full-stack physical, virtual, and cloud infrastructure, along with virtual machine, container, operating system, and application level insights. vROps provides performance and capacity optimisation, monitoring and alerting, troubleshooting and remediation, and dashboards and reporting. vROps also handles private costings, showback, and what-if scenarios for VMware, VMware Cloud, and public cloud workloads. Many of these features have been released with version 8.2, and now work slicker fully integrated into the vROps user interface, rather than a standalone product. Previously vRealize Business would cater for similar costing requirements, but has since been declared end of life.

vRealize Operations can be deployed on-premises to an existing VMware environment, or consumed Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). vRealize Operations Cloud has the same functionality, with the ongoing operational overhead of lifecycle management and maintenance taken care of by VMware. Multiple vCenter Servers or cloud accounts can be managed and monitored from a single vROps instance. For more information on vROps see the What is vRealize Operations product page.

vRealize Operations Manager 8.2 Install Guide

The vRealize Operations Manager installation for lone instances is really straight forward, as is applying management packs for monitoring additional environments. Where the installation may get more complex, is if multiple cluster nodes need to be deployed, along with remote collector nodes, and/or multiple instances. If you think this may apply to you review the complexity levels outlined in the vRealize Operations Manager 8.2 Deployment Guide.

The installation steps below walk through the process of installing vROps using the master node. All deployments start out with a master node, which in some cases is sufficient to manage itself and perform all data collection and analysis operations. Optional nodes can be added in the form of; further data nodes for larger deployments, replica nodes for highly available deployments, and remote collector nodes for distributed deployments. Remote collector nodes, for example, can be used to compress and encrypt data collected at another site or another VMware Cloud platform. This could be an architecture where a solution like Azure VMware Solution is in use, with an on-premises installation of vROps. For more information on the different node types and availability setups see the deployment guide linked above.

When considering the deployment size and node design for vROps, review the VMware KB ​vRealize Operations Manager Sizing Guidelines, which is kept up to date with sizing requirements for the latest versions. The compute and storage allocations needed depend on your environment, the type of data collected, the data retention period, and the deployment type.

Installation

Before starting ensure you have a static IP address ready for the master node, or (ideally and) a Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) with forward and reverse DNS entries. For larger than single node deployments check the Cluster Requirements section of the deployment guide.

The vRealize Operations Manager appliance can be downloaded in Open Virtualisation Format (OVF) here, and the release note for v8.2.0 here. As with many VMware products a 60 day evaluation period is applied. The vRealize Operations Manager OVF needs to be deployed for each vROps cluster node in the environment. Deployment and configuration of vRealize Operations Manager can also be automated using vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager.

vRealize Operations Manager download

Log into the vSphere client and deploy the OVF (right click the data centre, cluster, or host object and select Deploy OVF Template).

The deployment interface prompts for the usual options like compute, storage, and IP address allocation, as well as the appliance size based on the sizing guidelines above. Do not include an underscore (_) in the hostname. The disk sizes (20 GB, 250 GB, 4 GB) are the same regardless of the appliance size configured. New disks can be added, but extending existing disks is not supported. Also be aware that snapshots can cause performance degradation and should not be used. For this deployment I have selected a small deployment; 4 CPU, 16 GB RAM.

Once deployed browse to the appliance FQDN or IP address to complete the appliance setup. You can double check the IP address from the virtual machine page in vSphere or the remote console. For larger environments and additional settings like custom certificates, high availability, and multiple nodes select New Installation. In this instance since vROps will be managing only a single vCenter with 3 or 4 hosts I select the Express Installation.

vRealize Operations Manager start page

The vRealize Operations Manager appliance will be set as the master node, this configuration can be scaled out later on if needed. Click Next to continue.

vRealize Operations Manager new cluster setup

Set an administrator password at least 8 characters long, with an uppercase and lowercase letter, number, and special character, then click Next. Note that the user name is admin, and not administrator.

vRealize Operations Manager administrator credentials

Click Finish to apply the configuration. A loading bar preparing vRealize Operations Manager for first use will appear. This stage can take up to 15 minutes.

vRealize Operations Manager initial setup

Login with the username admin and the password set earlier.

vRealize Operations Manager login page

There are a few final steps to configure before gaining access to the user interface. Click Next.

vRealize Operations Manager final setup

Accept the End User License Agreement (EULA) and click Next.

vRealize Operations Manager terms and conditions

Enter the license information and click Next.

vRealize Operations Manager license information

Select or deselect the Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP) option and click Next. Click Finish to progress to the vROps user interface.

vRealize Operations Manager final setup

Finally we’re into vRealize Operations home page, take a look around, or go straight into Add Cloud Account.

vRealize Operations Manager home page

Select the account type, in this case we’re adding a vCenter.

vRealize Operations Manager account types

Enter a name for the account, and the vCenter Server FQDN or IP address. I’m using the default collector group since we are only monitoring a small lab environment. You can test using Validate Connection, then click Add.

vRealize Operations Manager add vCenter Server

Give the vCenter account a few minutes to sync up, the status should change to OK. A message in the right-hand corner will notify that the vCenter collection is in progress.

vRealize Operations Manager vCenter collection

Back at the home page a prompt is displayed to set the currency; configurable under Administration, Management, Global Settings, Currency. In this case I’ve set GBP(£). For accurate cost comparisons and environment specific optimisations you can also add your own costs for things like hardware, software, facilities, and labour. Cost data can be customised under Administration, Configuration, Cost Settings.

vRealize Operations Manager quick start page

A common next step is to configure access using your corporate Identity Provider, such as Active Directory. Click Administration, Access, Authentication Sources, Add, and configure the relevant settings.

Multiple vCenter Servers can be managed from the vRealize Operations Manager interface. Individual vCenter Servers can also access vROps data from the vSphere client, from the Menu dropdown and vRealize Operations. A number of nested ESXi hosts are shut down in this environment which is generating the critical errors in the screenshot.

vRealize Operations Manager overview page

Featured image by Jonas Svidras on Unsplash

VMware vRealize Business for Cloud Install

VMware vRealize Business (vRB) for Cloud was removed from GA back in 2019, with general support expiring 11 April 2022. The functionality included in vRB, fine-grain cost analytics and public cloud cost comparison, is available within vRealize Operations Advanced from v8.2 onwards. You can see how to install vRealize Operations here.

VMware vRealize Business for Cloud provides automated cost analysis and consumption metering; allowing administrators to make workload placement decisions between private and pulic clouds based on cost and available services. Furthermore infrastructure stakeholders have full visibility of virtual machine provisioning costs and are able to accurately manage capital expenditure and operating expenditure. For more information see the vRealize Business product page, you can try vRealize Business for Cloud using the Hands on Labs available here.

This post will walk through the installation of vRealize Business for Cloud 7.3; we’ll be provisioning to a vSphere environment running vRealize Automation 7.3. Each vRealize Business instance scales up to 20,000 virtual machines and 10 vCenter Servers, remote data collectors can be deployed to distributed geographical sites. vRealize Business is deployed in OVA format as a virtual appliance, you should ensure this appliance is backed up appropriately. There is no built in HA or DR functionality within vRealize Business, but you can take advantage of VMware components such as High Availability, Fault Tolerance, or Site Recovery Manager. Logs can be output to a syslog server such as vRealize Log Insight.

vRB_Launchpad

Requirements

  • vRealize Business for Cloud must be deployed to an ESXi host, and can be used to mange vCenter Server, vCloud Director, vCloud Air, vRealize Automation, and vRealize Operations Manager.
  • vRB 7.3 is compatible with vCenter and ESXi versions 5.5 through to 6.5, and vRealize Automation verisons 6.2.4 through to 7.3 (latest versions at the time of writing).
  • For compatibilty with other VMware products see the VMware Product Interoperability Matrix.
  • The vRB appliance requires 8 GB memory, 4 vCPU and 50 GB disk (thick provisioned).
  • If you use any remote data collectors the memory on these appliances can be reduced to 2 GB.
  • vRealize Business for Cloud is licensed as part of the vRealize suite, per CPU, or in packs of 25-OSI.
  • There are 2 available editions; standard and advanced. Features such as public cloud costing require the advanced version, for more information see the feature comparison section of the product page.
  • The web UI can be accessed from IE 10 or later, Chrome 36.x or later, and Firefox 31.x and later.
  • Time synchronization and name resolution should be in place across all VMware components.
  • For a full list of pre-requisites including port requirements see here.

Before beginning review the following VMware links:

Installing vRB

Download the VMware vRealize Business for Cloud 7.3 OVA file here. Log into the vSphere web client and right click the datastore, cluster, or host where you want to deploy the virtual appliance. Select Deploy OVF Template and browse to the location of the OVA file.

  • Enter a name for the virtual appliance and select the deployment location, click Next.
  • Confirm the compute resource and click Next.
  • Review the details of the OVF template and click Next.
  • Accept the end user license agreement and click Next.
  • Select the storage for the virtual appliance, ensure the virtual disk format is set to Thick provision eager zeroed, and click Next.
  • Select the network to attach to the virtual appliance and click Next.
  • Set the Currency, note that at this time the currency cannot be changed after deployment. Ensure Enable Server is checked, select or de-select SSH and the customer experience improvement program based on your own preferences. Configure a Root user password for the virtual appliance and enter the network settings for the virtual appliance in the Networking Properties fields.
  • Click Next and review the summary page. Click Finish to deploy the virtual appliance.

Once the virtual appliance has been deployed and powered on open a web browser to https://vRB:5480, where vRB is the IP address or FQDN of the appliance. Log in with the root account configured during setup.

vRB_Mgmt

Verify the settings under AdministrationTime Settings, and Network. At this stage the appliance is ready to be registered with a cloud solution. In this example I will be using vRealize Automation, for other products or further information see the install guide referenced above. Return to the Registration tab and ensure vRA is selected.

vRB_Register

Enter the host name or IP address of the vRA appliance or load balancer. Enter the name of the vRA default tenant and the default tenant administrator username and password. Select Accept vRealize Automation certificate and click Register.

Accessing vRB

vRealize Business for Cloud can be integrated into vRealize Automation, or you can enable stand-alone access. To access vRB after integrating with vRA log into the vRA portal. First open the Administration tab, select Directory Users and Computers, search for a user or group and assign the relevant business management roles. A user with a business management role has access to the Business Management tab in vRA.

vRB_Roles

Optional: to enable stand-alone access first enable SSH from the Administration tab. Use a client such as Putty to open an SSH connection to the virtual appliance, log in with the root account. Enter cd /usr/ITFM-Cloud/va-tools/bin to change directory, enter sh manage-local-user.sh and select the operation, in this case 5 to enable local authentication.

ssh

If you want to create new local users user option 1 and enter the username and password, when prompted for permissions VCBM_ALL provides administrator access and VCBM_VIEW read-only. You can also log in to the web UI with the root account, although it would be better practice to create a separate account.

Disable SSH from the Administration tab if required. Wait a few minutes for the services to restart and then browse to https://IP/itfm-cloud/login.html, where IP is the IP address of your appliance. If you try to access this URL without enabling stand-alone access you will receive a HTTP Status 401 – Authentication required error message.

vRB Configuration

We will continue with the configuration in the vRA portal, open the Administration tab and click Business Management.

vRB_Connections

Expand License Information, enter a license key and click Save. Expand Manage Private Cloud Connections, configure the required connections. In this example I have added multiple vCenter Server endpoints. Open the Business Management tab, the Launchpad will load.

vRB_Launchpad

Select Expenses, Private Cloud (vSphere) and click Edit Expenses. At this stage you will need the figures associated with hardware, storage, and licensing for the environment. You can also add costs for maintenance, labour, network, facilities, and any other additional costs.

vRB_Expenses_vSphere

Once vRB is populated with the new infrastructure costs utilisation and projected pricing will start to be updated. Consumption showback, what-if analysis, and public cloud comparisons can all be accessed from the navigation menu on the left hand side. For further guidance on getting the most out of vRB see the vRealize Business for Cloud User Guide.

vRB_Operational