Configuring VVols with HPE Nimble Storage

esxsi.com

This post will walk through the setup of VMware Virtual Volumes (VVols) with HPE Nimble Storage. The post was originally published in September 2016 and has subsequently been brought up to date, the process remains largely the same and in this example we will use the vSphere 6.7 HTML5 client and Nimble software version 5.0.4. The terminology and features of Virtual Volumes are detailed in KB 2113013 (Understanding Virtual Volumes (VVols) in VMware vSphere 6.7).

HPE_Nimble

Nimble VVol Components

Nimble software includes the vStorage APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA) provider and the PE (Protocol Endpoint) built into the operating system. This means that the VASA provider and Protocol Endpoint run natively from the controller, so there is no additional installation or configuration required. This design also benefits from the highly available setup of Nimble controllers.

Virtual machines are provisioned based on the VMware Storage Policy Based Management (SPBM) framework which uses the…

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Demo

This opening post will give an overview and demo of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI). Oracle Cloud offers fast and scalable compute and storage resources, combined with enterprise-grade private virtual cloud networks. Oracle Cloud offers a range of flexible operating models including traditional Virtual Machine (VM) instances, container infrastructure, databases on demand, and dedicated hardware through bare metal servers and Bring Your Own Hypervisor (BYOH).

You can sign up for a free trial account with $300 credit here. When you sign up for an Oracle account you are creating a tenant. Resources inside a tenant can be organised and isolated using compartments, separate projects, billing, and access policies are some use case examples.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure is deployed in regions. Regions are localised geographical areas, each containing at least 3 Availability Domains. An Availability Domain is a fault-independent data centre with power, thermal, and network isolation. A Virtual Cloud Network (VCN) is deployed per region across multiple Availability Domains, thereby allowing us to build high availability and fault tolerance into our cloud design. Virtual Cloud Networks are software defined versions of traditional on-premise networks running in the cloud, containing subnets, route tables, and internet gateways. VCNs can be connected together using VCN Peering, and connected to a private network using Fast Connect or VPN with the use of a Dynamic Routing Gateway (DRG).

Product Page | Getting Started | Documentation | Sizing and Pricing | Architecture

Product Demo

The demo below creates a VCN and VM instances in the second generation of Oracle Cloud for lab purposes. Before deploying your own environment you should review all the above linked documentation and plan your cloud strategy including IP addressing, DNS, authentication, access control, billing, governance, network connectivity and security.

Log into the Oracle Cloud portal here, the home dash board is displayed.

Oracle_Dashboard

You’ll need a subscription to get into the second generation Oracle Cloud Infrastructure portal. Under Compute select Open Service Console.

Oracle_Cloud_Dashboard

The region can be selected from the drop-down location pin icon in the top right corner, in this example the region is set to eu-frankfurt-1. Select Manage Regions to subscribe to new regions if required. Use the top left Menu button to display the various options. The first step in any deployment is to build the VCN, select Networking and Virtual Cloud Networks.

Oracle_Cloud_Dashboard

Make sure you are in the correct compartment in the left hand column and click Create Virtual Cloud Network. Select the compartment and enter a name, in this example I am going to create the Virtual Cloud Network only which will allow me to manually define resources such as the CIDR block, internet gateway, subnets, and routes. The DNS label is auto-populated.

Oracle_VCN_1

The newly created VCN is displayed, all objects are orange during provisioning and green when available.

Oracle_VCN_3

Once the VCN is available click the VCN name to display more options.

Oracle_VCN_4

Use the options in the Resources menu to view and create resources assigned to the VCN. In this example first we’ll create the Internet Gateway.

Oracle_Cloud_IG_1

Next we can create a subnet, in this example I have created a public subnet that I will later attach a VM instance to.

Oracle_Cloud_Subnet_1Oracle_Cloud_Subnet_2

We also need to add a route table or new routes into the default route table.

Oracle_Cloud_Route

The final step to allow connectivity in and out of our new subnet(s) is to define ingress and egress rules using security lists. Again you can either add rules to the default section or split out environments into additional security lists.

Oracle_Cloud_Security_1

Define the source and destination types and port ranges to allow access. In this example we are allowing in port 22 to test SSH connectivity for a VM instance.

Oracle_Cloud_Security_2

Now that we have a fully functioning software defined network we can deploy a VM instance. From the left hand Menu drop-down select Compute, Instances. Use the Create Instance wizard to deploy a virtual machine or bare metal machine.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance

In this example I have deployed a virtual machine using the Oracle Linux 7.5 image and VM.Standard2.1 shape (1 OCPU, 15 GB RAM). The machine is deployed to Availability Domain 1 in the Frankfurt region and has been assigned the public subnet in the VCN we created earlier. I used PUTTYgen to generate public and private key pairs for SSH access.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_2

Once deployed the instance turns green.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_3

Click the instance name to view further details or terminate, when removing you have the option to keep or delete the attached boot volume.

Oracle_Cloud_Instance_4

Additional block volumes can be added to instances. Block volumes can be created under Block Storage, Block Volumes.

Oracle_Cloud_Block_2

For object based storage we can create buckets under Object Storage, Object Storage.

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_1

Buckets can be used to store objects with public or private visibility, pre-auth requests can also be added for short term access.

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_2

Oracle_Cloud_Bucket_3

vRA Deployments with Terraform

This post covers notes made when using Terraform to deploy basic resources from VMware vRealize Automation (vRA). Read through the vRA provider plugin page here and the Terraform documentation here. There are a couple of other examples of Terraform configurations using the vRA provider here and here. If you’re looking for an introduction on why Terraform and vRA then this blog post gives a good overview. If you have worked with the vRA Terraform provider before feel free to add any additional pointers or best practises in the comments section, as this is very much a work in progress.

Terraform Setup

Before starting you will need to download and install Go and Git to the machine you are running Terraform from. Visual Studio Code with the Terraform extension is also a handy tool for editing config files but not a requirement. The steps below were validated with Windows 10 and vRA 7.3.

After installing Go the default GOROOT is set to C:\Go and GOPATH to %UserProfile%\Go. Go is  the programming language we will use to rebuild the vRA provider plugin. GOPATH is going to be the location of the directory containing source files for Go projects.

In this instance I have set GOPATH to D:\Terraform and will keep all files in this location. To change GOPATH manually open Control Panel, System, Advanced system settings, Advanced, Environment Variables. Alternatively GOROOT and GOPATH can be set from CLI:

set GOROOT=C:\Go
set GOPATH=D:\Terraform

Download Terraform for Windows, put the executable in the working directory for Terraform (D:\Terraform or whatever GOPATH was set to).

In AppData\Roaming create a new file terraform.rc (%UserProfile%\AppData\Roaming\terraform.rc) with the following contents, replace D:\Terraform with your own Terraform working directory.

providers {
     vra7 = "D:\\Terraform\\bin\\terraform-provider-vra7.exe"
}

Open command prompt and navigate to the Terraform working directory. Run the following command to download the source repository:

go get github.com/vmware/terraform-provider-vra7et GOROOT=C:\Go

Open the Terraform working directory and confirm the repository source files have been downloaded.

The final step is to rebuild the Terraform provider using Go. Download the latest version of dep. Rename the executable to dep.exe and place in your Terraform working directory under \src\github.com\vmware\terraform-provider-vra7.

Back in command prompt navigate to D:\Terraform\src\github.com\vmware\terraform-provider-vra7 and run:

dep ensure
go build -o D:\Terraform\bin\terraform-provider-vra7.exe

Running dep ensure can take a while, use the -v switch if you need to troubleshoot. The vRA Terraform provider is now ready to use.

Using Terraform

In the Terraform working directory a main.tf file is needed to describe the infrastructure and set variables. There are a number of example Terraform configuration files located in the source repository files under \src\github.com\vmware\terraform-provider-vra7\example.

A very basic example of a configuration file would first contain the vRA variables:

provider "vra7" {
     username = "username"
     password = "password"
     tenant = "vRAtenant"
     host = "https://vRA
}

Followed by the resource details:

resource "vra7_resource" "machine" {
   catalog_name = "BlueprintName"
}

Further syntax can be added to pass additional variables, for a full list see the resource section here. The configuration file I am using for the purposes of this example is as follows:

main_tf

Example config and variable files from source repo:

multi_machine_example

variables_example

Once your Terraform configuration file or files are ready go back to command prompt and navigate to the Terraform working directory. Type terraform and hit enter to see the available options, for a full list of commands see the Terraform CLI documentation here.

Start off with initialising the vRA provider plugin:

terraform init

terraform_init

Validate the Terraform configuration files:

terraform validate

If you’re ready then start the deployment:

terraform apply

terraform_apply_1

Monitor the progress from the CLI or from the task that is created in the Requests tab of the vRA portal.

terraform_apply_2

terraform_apply_3

Check the state of the active deployments using the available switches for:

terraform state

terraform_state

To destroy the resource use:

terraform destroy

terraform_destroy

NSX 6.4.1 Upgrade Guide

This post will walk through upgrading to NSX 6.4.1. If upgrading from 6.4.0 then the new Upgrade Coordinator feature can be used, allowing simultaneous upgrade planning of multiple NSX objects, see the NSX 6.4.x Upgrade Coordinator post for more information. If upgrading from an earlier version than 6.4.0 then the steps outlined below are applicable. When performing an upgrade the NSX components must be upgraded in the following order: NSX Manager, NSX Controllers, Host Clusters, NSX Edge, Service Virtual Machines (such as Guest Introspection).

Review the operational impacts of NSX upgrades for each component here when planning your upgrade, it is best practise to limit all operations in the environment until the upgrade is complete. Make sure NSX Manager is backed up before starting an upgrade, and be aware that after a successful upgrade NSX cannot be downgraded. You should also review the VMware NSX for vSphere 6.4.1 Release Notes here and NSX for vSphere Documentation Center here.

Requirements

Requirements specific to NSX 6.4.1 are listed below. As we are doing an upgrade the assumption is that the vSphere and NSX environment is already setup and working, you can validate the existing NSX configuration here. You should also ensure an underlying network with IP connectivity and an MTU size of 1600 or above, FQDN resolution, connectivity, and time synchronisation between NSX and vSphere components, syslog, monitoring, and backups are all in place. In addition review the basic system requirements for NSX here and the full list of network port requirements here.

  • NSX 6.4.1 is compatible with vSphere versions 6.0 U2 and above, also note; if you are using 6.0 then U3 is recommended, the minimum supported version for 6.5 is 6.5a, support for 5.5 has now been removed
  • Supported upgrade paths to NSX 6.4.1 are from 6.2.4 onwards, there is a workaround for upgrading from 6.2.0, 6.2.1, or 6.2.2 which can be found here
  • Review the VMware Upgrade Path page here and also fully review the NSX 6.4.1 Release Notes here, as there are a number of things to be aware of when upgrading from 6.2.x or 6.3.x
  • Check compatibility with VMware products using the VMware Interoperability page here
  • Check compatibility with other third party products such as partner services for Guest Introspection using the VMware Compatibility Guide here
  • Before starting the upgrade make sure existing appliances meet the recommended hardware requirements:
    • NSX Manager 16 GB RAM (24 GB for large deployments), 4 vCPU (8 vCPU for large deployments), and 60 GB disk, a large deployment is typically 256+ hosts or 2000+ VMs
    • NSX Controllers 4 GB RAM, 4 vCPU, and 28 GB disk
    • NSX Edge Compact: 512 MB RAM, 1 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. Large: 1 GB RAM, 2 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. Quad Large: 2 GB RAM, 4 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. X-Large: 8 GB RAM, 6 vCPU, 584 MB + 2 GB + 256 MB disks.
  • Verify the existing NSX Manager has sufficient space by connecting to the CLI (if using SSH service may need starting on the summary page of NSX Manager appliance page) and running show filesystems
  • Maximum latency between NSX components and NSX and vSphere components should be 150 ms RTT or below
  • NSX Data Security is no longer supported, it should be removed if installed prior to the upgrade
  • If you are using Cross-vCenter NSX then each component should be upgraded in the order listed here
  • Enabling DRS on the vSphere cluster allows running VMs to be automatically migrated when each host is placed into maintenance mode for the NSX VIB upgrades. This process can of course be undertaken manually if DRS is not in use
  • A completed upgrade can be validated following the steps listed here

Backups

Before we start take a backup of the vCenter Server and NSX Manager. NSX configuration can be backed up using FTP/SFTP, see this post for more information. From version 6.4.1 a configuration backup is automatically taken at the start of the upgrade process, this is intended as a fall back and you should still take your own backup before beginning. You can also take a snapshot of the NSX Manager incase we need to revert back the NSX Manager upgrade. For extra peace of mind export the vSphere Distributed Switch configuration by following the instructions here.

In the event you do need to restore from an NSX backup a new appliance should be deployed and the configuration restored, click here for further details.

Upgrade Process

As noted above make sure you have read all the linked documentation, specifically the release notes and operational impacts for each component upgrade. The steps below will not list the operational impact for each step of the upgrade.

Download the NSX for vSphere 6.4.1 Upgrade Bundle from the download page here to a location accessible from the NSX Manager. Browse to the NSX Manager and log in as admin. From the home page click Upgrade.

Click Upload Bundle and browse to the upgrade bundle downloaded earlier, click Continue. Once the bundle is uploaded you can (optional) select to enable SSH and/or join the Customer Experience Improvement Program. Click Upgrade to start the upgrade.

NSX64_1

The installer will now upgrade NSX Manager, once complete you will be returned to the login page.

NSX64_2

Log back into NSX Manager and click Upgrade. Verify the upgrade state is complete and the version number is correct. Click Summary and verify the health of the NSX Manager.

NSX64_3

Log into the vSphere Client, if you were already logged in then log out and back in, or you may need to clear your browser cache. From the Menu drop-down select Networking and Security.

Before upgrading any other components we need to upgrade the NSX Controller Cluster. On the Dashboard tab confirm there are 3 controller nodes all connected, the upgrade cannot commence if any nodes are in a disconnected state.

NSX64_5

Click Installation and Upgrade and select the Management and NSX Managers tab. Check the NSX Manager version is correct, in the Controller Cluster Status column click Upgrade Available.

NSX641_1

Each controller is upgraded and rebooted one at a time. From NSX 6.3.3 onwards the underlying operating system of the controller nodes changed to Photon-OS. If you are upgrading from 6.3.3 onwards an in-place upgrade is applied. If you are upgrading from 6.3.2 or earlier then the controller nodes are redeployed, any DRS rules anti-affinity rules are lost and will need to be reapplied.

Click Yes to being the Controller Cluster upgrade.

NSX641_2

Monitor the status in the NSX Controller Nodes tab. After all the controller nodes have been upgraded validated the Status, Peers, and Upgrade Status are all green. Confirm the Software Version is correct.

NSX641_3

Next we can upgrade the host NSX VIBs, click the Host Preparation tab. Clusters running NSX are displayed, upgrades are initiated on a per cluster basis. Select the cluster and click Upgrade to begin the upgrade.

Hosts running NSX 6.2.x require a reboot for the installation of new VIBs, hosts running NSX 6.3.0 and above do not need a reboot but must be placed into maintenance mode. You can either manually place hosts into maintenance mode and vMotion / power off VMs yourself, or allow DRS to live migrate VMs and remediate hosts one at a time.

NSX641_4

Click Yes to commence the cluster upgrade.

NSX641_5

At this stage if hosts are not in maintenance mode the NSX Installation will show Not Ready. If you have DRS enabled on the cluster click Actions and Resolve All, this will automatically vMotion running machines from a host, place into maintenance mode, update the VIBs, and exit maintenance mode, one host at a time. Alternatively you can select individual hosts and click Resolve if you want to control the order of the upgrades.

NSX641_6

Monitor the status of the NSX Installations in the Hosts table. You can also monitor Recent Tasks to make sure a host is not taking too long to enter maintenance mode, if a host cannot be evacuated due to DRS rules, or a VM that cannot be migrated then manual intervention may be required (in this case see here).

If you are using stateless images with Auto Deploy you should also update your ESXi image with the latest NSX VIBs or they will be lost at next reboot, for guidance see this post.

NSX641_7

The next step is to upgrade NSX Edges. Before commencing with validate the status of all NSX prepared hosts is green and they are showing successfully upgraded to the correct version. During Edge upgrades a replacement appliance is deployed which means 2 appliances (or 4 if running in HA mode) are powered on at the same time, ensure your cluster has sufficient compute resource.

NSX641_8

At the time of writing (v6.4.1) NSX Edges still need to be upgraded using the vSphere web client. Log into the vSphere web client and click Networking & Security, NSX Edges, deployed Edges are displayed .If you have multiple NSX Managers ensure the correct NSX Manager is selected in the drop-down. Select the NSX Edge to upgrade and from the Actions menu click Upgrade Version.

NSX641_9

The upgraded version will be deployed from OVF, you can follow the progress in the Recent Tasks pane and also the Status column for the Edge. Repeat this process for each Edge Services Gateway (ESG) and Distributed Logical Router (DLR) you wish to upgrade.

NSX641_10

The final stage is to upgrade Guest Introspection. This can either be done in the vSphere web client or by going back into the HTML5 web client. From the Menu drop-down select Networking and Security, click Installation and Upgrade and the Service Deployment tab. Existing service deployments are listed, the Installation Status for Guest Introspection shows Upgrade Available. Select the Guest Introspection deployment and click Upgrade, once complete verify the Installation Status and Service Status are both green and the version number is correct.

NSX641_11

After all NSX components are upgraded if you want to follow additional verification steps then see the upgrade validation KB here, or the post upgrade tasks listed here. You should take a further backup of NSX Manager after completion of the upgrade. Any third party appliances for Guest Introspection or Network Introspection that require an update can now be upgraded.

NSX 6.4.x Upgrade Coordinator

This post will walk through an upgrade to NSX 6.4.1 using the new Upgrade Coordinator feature allowing simultaneous upgrade planning of multiple NSX components. If you are upgrading from an earlier version of NSX, see the NSX 6.4.1 Upgrade Guide post for details on upgrading individual components. From version 6.4 onwards upgrade plans can be used to upgrade host clusters, controller clusters, Edge Service Gateways (ESGs), Distributed Logical Routers – including Universal (DLRs and UDLRs), and Service Virtual Machines such as Guest Introspection. Upgrade plans consist of either a one click system managed upgrade, or planning your own upgrade where objects and options can be customised.

Review the operational impacts of NSX upgrades for each component here when planning your upgrade, it is best practise to limit all operations in the environment until the upgrade is complete. Make sure NSX Manager is backed up before starting an upgrade, and be aware that after a successful upgrade NSX cannot be downgraded. You should also review the VMware NSX for vSphere 6.4.1 Release Notes here and NSX for vSphere Documentation Center here.

Requirements

Requirements specific to NSX 6.4.1 are listed below. As we are doing an upgrade the assumption is that the vSphere and NSX environment is already setup and working, you can validate the existing NSX configuration here. You should also ensure an underlying network with IP connectivity and an MTU size of 1600 or above, FQDN resolution, connectivity, and time synchronisation between NSX and vSphere components, syslog, monitoring, and backups are all in place. In addition review the basic system requirements for NSX here and the full list of network port requirements here.

  • NSX 6.4.1 is compatible with vSphere versions 6.0 U2 and above, also note; if you are using 6.0 then U3 is recommended, the minimum supported version for 6.5 is 6.5a, support for 5.5 has now been removed
  • Supported upgrade paths to NSX 6.4.1 are from 6.2.4 onwards, there is a workaround for upgrading from 6.2.0, 6.2.1, or 6.2.2 which can be found here
  • Review the VMware Upgrade Path page here and also fully review the NSX 6.4.1 Release Notes here, as there are a number of things to be aware of when upgrading from 6.2.x or 6.3.x
  • Check compatibility with VMware products using the VMware Interoperability page here
  • Check compatibility with other third party products such as partner services for Guest Introspection using the VMware Compatibility Guide here
  • Before starting the upgrade make sure existing appliances meet the recommended hardware requirements:
    • NSX Manager 16 GB RAM (24 GB for large deployments), 4 vCPU (8 vCPU for large deployments), and 60 GB disk, a large deployment is typically 256+ hosts or 2000+ VMs
    • NSX Controllers 4 GB RAM, 4 vCPU, and 28 GB disk
    • NSX Edge Compact: 512 MB RAM, 1 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. Large: 1 GB RAM, 2 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. Quad Large: 2 GB RAM, 4 vCPU, 584 MB + 512 MB disks. X-Large: 8 GB RAM, 6 vCPU, 584 MB + 2 GB + 256 MB disks.
  • Verify the existing NSX Manager has sufficient space by connecting to the CLI (if using SSH service may need starting on the summary page of NSX Manager appliance page) and running show filesystems
  • Maximum latency between NSX components and NSX and vSphere components should be 150 ms RTT or below
  • NSX Data Security is no longer supported, it should be removed if installed prior to the upgrade
  • If you are using Cross-vCenter NSX then each component should be upgraded in the order listed here
  • Enabling DRS on the vSphere cluster allows running VMs to be automatically migrated when each host is placed into maintenance mode for the NSX VIB upgrades. This process can of course be undertaken manually if DRS is not in use
  • A completed upgrade can be validated following the steps listed here

Backups

Before we start take a backup of the vCenter Server and NSX Manager. NSX configuration can be backed up using FTP/SFTP, see this post for more information. From version 6.4.1 a configuration backup is automatically taken at the start of the upgrade process, this is intended as a fall back and you should still take your own backup before beginning. You can also take a snapshot of the NSX Manager incase we need to revert back the NSX Manager upgrade. For extra peace of mind export the vSphere Distributed Switch configuration by following the instructions here.

In the event you do need to restore from an NSX backup a new appliance should be deployed and the configuration restored, click here for further details.

Upgrade Process

As noted above make sure you have read all the linked documentation, specifically the release notes and operational impacts for each component upgrade. The steps below will not list the operational impact for each step of the upgrade.

Download the NSX for vSphere 6.4.1 Upgrade Bundle from the download page here to a location accessible from the NSX Manager. Browse to the NSX Manager and log in as admin. From the home page click Upgrade.

Click Upload Bundle and browse to the upgrade bundle downloaded earlier, click Continue. Once the bundle is uploaded you can (optional) select to enable SSH and/or join the Customer Experience Improvement Program. Click Upgrade to start the upgrade.

NSX64_1

The installer will now upgrade NSX Manager, once complete you will be returned to the login page.

NSX64_2

Log back into NSX Manager and click Upgrade. Verify the upgrade state is complete and the version number is correct. Click Summary and verify the health of the NSX Manager.

NSX64_3

Log into the vSphere Client, if you were already logged in then log out and back in, or you may need to clear your browser cache. From the Menu drop-down select Networking and Security.

For any upgrade plan the NSX Controller Cluster upgrade is mandatory and performed first. On the Dashboard tab confirm there are 3 controller nodes all connected, the upgrade cannot commence if any nodes are in a disconnected state.

NSX64_5

Click Installation and Upgrade and select the Upgrade tab. Review the components, any warnings, and current and target version details.

NSX64_4

To start an upgrade plan click Plan Upgrade.

Upgrade Coordinator puts objects of the same type in default upgrade groups when planning an upgrade. These groups and other settings can be modified by planning your own upgrade (controller upgrades are mandatory) or you can allow the system to upgrade everything using a one click upgrade. Select the desired upgrade plan and click Next.

NSX64_7

The default options for the one click upgrade are to upgrade Host Clusters and Service VMs individually (serial), and to upgrade NSX Edges all together (parallel). There is no pause between components or pause on error. If you are happy with these settings then click Start Upgrade to being the upgrade process, otherwise go back to Plan Your Upgrade.

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Select your own upgrade to choose which components are upgraded, controller upgrades are mandatory and are done first. You can also pause the upgrade between components or pause the upgrade if an error is returned.

NSX64_9

The next 3 pages of the Upgrade Coordinator allow you to manage upgrade groups for Host Clusters, NSX Edges, and Service VMs. When planning your upgrade take into consideration the following:

  • Objects of the same type can be added to or removed from an upgrade group
  • The order of object upgrades within a group can be changed
  • All components included in an upgrade group must be upgraded before the next component type can be upgraded, e.g. all hosts included in an upgrade plan must be upgraded before moving onto Edges, and so on
  • Excluding an object within an upgrade group is useful for multiple maintenance windows, where you want to add an object to an upgrade plan but exclude them from this upgrade session
  • If the upgrade order within group is set to Serial then each object is upgraded one at a time, if it is Parallel then multiple objects within that group are upgraded at the same time

Controller Upgrades: each controller is upgraded and rebooted one at a time. From NSX 6.3.3 onwards the underlying operating system of the controller nodes changed to Photon-OS. If you are upgrading from 6.3.3 onwards an in-place upgrade is applied. If you are upgrading from 6.3.2 or earlier then the controller nodes are redeployed, any DRS rules anti-affinity rules are lost and will need to be reapplied.

Host Upgrades: hosts running NSX 6.2.x require a reboot for the installation of new VIBs, hosts running NSX 6.3.0 and above do not need a reboot but must be placed into maintenance mode. You can either manually place hosts into maintenance mode and vMotion / power off VMs yourself, or allow DRS to live migrate VMs and remediate hosts one at a time. Monitor the status of the NSX Installations on the Upgrade tab. You can also monitor Recent Tasks to make sure a host is not taking too long to enter maintenance mode, if a host cannot be evacuated due to DRS rules, or a VM that cannot be migrated then manual intervention may be required (in this case see here).

If you are using stateless images with Auto Deploy you should also update your ESXi image with the latest NSX VIBs or they will be lost at next reboot, for guidance see this post.

NSX64_10

Configure your upgrade plan based on the components you want to upgrade in this session, and review the final plan. When you’re read click Start Upgrade to begin the upgrade process.

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Monitor the status of the upgrade on the Upgrade page. If any warnings or errors are displayed during the upgrade process see the Monitor and Troubleshoot Your Upgrade page here. If you selected Pause between components you must Resume or Replan after each stage of the upgrade.

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An in-progress upgrade plan can still be paused to make modifications; when paused the object currently being upgraded will continue and the upgrade plan pauses when this object upgrade succeeds or fails.

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After the upgrade is complete verify the Upgrade page shows the system upgrade status successful.

nsx64_16

Verify the NSX health from the Dashboard page. After all NSX components are upgraded if you want to follow additional verification steps then see the upgrade validation KB here, or the post upgrade tasks listed here. You should take a further backup of NSX Manager after completion of the upgrade. Any third party appliances for Guest Introspection or Network Introspection that require an update can now be upgraded.

VMware Cloud on AWS Demo

This opening post will give an overview and demo of VMware Cloud on AWS. VMware Cloud on AWS provides on-demand, scalable cloud environments based on existing vSphere Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC) products. VMware and AWS have worked together to optimise running vSphere, vSAN and NSX, directly on dedicated, elastic, bare-metal AWS infrastructure without the need for nested virtualization. A SDDC cloud can be deployed in a few hours and then capacity scaled up and down within minutes.

Key Benefits

There are a number of benefits and use cases for extending on-premise data centers to the cloud with VMware Cloud on AWS:

  • VMware maintains software updates, emergency software patches, and auto-remediation of hardware failures
  • Increasing capacity in the cloud is generally quicker, easier, and sometimes more cost effective than increasing physical capacity in the data center
  • Scale capacity to protect services when met with temporary or unplanned demand
  • Improve business continuity by using the cloud for Disaster Recovery (DR) with VMware Site Recovery
  • Consistent operating environments allows for simplified cloud migrations with minimal re-training for system administrators
  • Transfer your existing operating system and third party licensing to the cloud and make use of existing support contracts with VMware
  • Expand footprint into additional geographical locations without needing to provision new data centers

Key Details

The following links contain enough reading to plan your VMware Cloud on AWS implementation and cloud migration strategy, the points below should be enough to get you started.

VMware Cloud on AWS: Product Documentation | Technical Overview | VMware Product Page | VMware FAQ| AWS Product Page | AWS FAQRoadmap | Case Study

Try first @ VMware Cloud on AWS – Getting Started Hands-on Lab

  • Each SDDC supports 4 to 32 hosts, each with 512 GB of memory and 2.3 GHz CPUs (custom-built Intel Xeon Processor E5-2686 v4 CPU package) with 18 cores per socket for a total of 36 cores
  • Each SDDC cluster uses an all-flash vSAN configuration utilising NVMe storage
  • An initial 4 host cluster provides roughly 21 TB usable capacity
  • Each ESXi host is connected to an Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) through Elastic Networking Adapter (ENA), which supports throughput up to 25 Gbps
  • Hybrid Cloud Extension allows stretched subnets between on-premise and cloud data centers for live migration of virtual machines
  • Hybrid Linked Mode allows administrators to connect vCenter Server running in VMware Cloud on AWS to an on-premises vCenter server to view both cloud and on-premises resources from a single interface
  • VMware Cloud on AWS complies with ISO 27001, ISO 27017, ISO 27018, SOC 1, SOC 2, SOC 3, HIPAA, and GDPR
  • VMware Cloud on AWS is managed from a web-based console or RESTful API
  • At the time of writing VMware Cloud on AWS is available in the AWS Europe (Frankfurt and London), AWS US East (N. Virginia) and AWS US West (Oregon) Regions
  • Basic pricing before discount can be calculated here

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Product Demo

The demo below creates a SDDC in the cloud for lab purposes. Before deploying your own environment you should review all the above linked documentation and do your own research to plan your cloud strategy as well as the following:

  • Identify or create an AWS account and ensure that all technical personnel have access to the account
  • Identify a VPC and subnet by cross-linking the AWS account to the SDDC
  • Allocate IP ranges for the SDDC, and determine a DNS strategy
  • Identify the authentication model for the SDDC
  • Plan connectivity to the SDDC
  • Develop a network security policy for the SDDC

Browse to the VMware Cloud Services portal (https://console.cloud.vmware.com) and login using your VMware ID. At the time of writing to access VMware Cloud on AWS you need to be invited or you can register for a 30 day single host trial here.

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Select VMware Cloud on AWS. If you have not used the service before you will be prompted to create a new organisation. Enter a name for your new organisation and accept the terms of service, click Continue.

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Add a credit card to be billed if you use the service. If you are using one of the free or trial methods outlined above you will not be billed.

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After you have created the organisation and added payment information you will be sent to the VMware Cloud on AWS dashboard. The first step is to create our SDDC in the cloud, click Create SDDC.

Billing: annual subscriptions are listed under the Subscriptions tab, you can see other billing information from the drop-down menu next to your organisation name: select Organisation Settings, View Organisation. From here you have services, identity and access management, billing and subscriptions, and support options.

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Select a region and deployment model for the SDDC, enter a name and the number of hosts if you are not using the single host deployment. Click Next.

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Follow the instructions to connect an AWS account and assign the relevant capabilities.

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Once the connection is successfully established click Next.

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Select the VPC and subnet to use then click Next.

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Specify a private subnet range for the management subnet or leave blank to use default addressing. As mentioned above ensure you have planned accordingly and are not using any ranges that will conflict with other networks you may connect in the future. Click Deploy SDDC.

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The SDDC will now be deployed, it takes around 2 hours to provision the ESXi hosts and all management components.

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Once the deployment is complete the dashboard will show the new SDDC and assigned resources. Click View Details (you can toggle the web portal theme using the Dark/Light options in the top right hand corner).

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From either the SDDC Summary tab or back on the SDDC dashboard you can seamlessly add additional hosts or clusters at any time.

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If needed the chat bubble in the bottom right hand corner of the screen will take you through to support.

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The Network tab shows the network topology and is where you can configure firewall rules, NAT rules, VPN, Direct Connect, etc.

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To access the vCenter Server through the vSphere client the port needs opening, a VPN can also be used. Under Management Gateway select Firewall Rules, click Add Rule. Configure the rule to allow access to the vCenter on port 443 and click Save.

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Click Open vCenter from either the Summary or Network tab, if access is in place you are given the cloudadmin@vmc.local credentials to open vCenter. Active Directory can also be configured as an identity source later on.

Once you are logged into the vSphere client you will see the familiar vSphere layout.

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It is also possible to see your on-premise vCenter Server(s) in the same pane of glass using Hybrid Linked Mode, click here for more information.

Back in the VMware Cloud on AWS portal the Add Ons tab features Site Recovery and Hybrid Cloud Extension for protecting and migrating workloads to your SDDC in the cloud.

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You can delete a SDDC from the Actions drop-down menu in either the SDDC Summary tab or the SDDC dashboard. Once a SDDC is deleted all workloads, data, and interfaces are destroyed and any public IP addresses released.

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VMware vSAN 6.7 Install Guide

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VMware vSAN utilises server attached flash devices and local hard disk drives to create a shared datastore across hosts in a vSphere cluster. VMware vSAN achieves high availability by adding a software layer leveraging existing server hardware to provide the same resiliency and features as expensive SAN, NAS, or DAS arrays. Further to this vSAN is uniquely embedded within the hypervisor kernel, directly in the I/O path allowing it to make rapid data placement decisions without the installation of additional VIBs or virtual appliances. This post intends to give an overview of vSAN 6.5/6.7 and how to enable it.

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For further reading visit the VMware Documentation Centre and expand vSAN under the relevant version.

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